Your Baby is the size of a

Lettuce

The third and final trimester is here! Right now, your baby is beginning its work to be in the right position for birth. While they’re getting everything ready on their end, why not prepare yourself at the same time? If you’re planning on using a birth plan, start putting this together ahead of time so you’re all ready for the big day. It’s quite common for your nasal passage to become a little swollen at this time, so you might be told off by your partner for snoring!

Week 28

Length : 37.5 cm

Weight : 997 g

Week 28
Length : 37.5 cm
Weight : 997 g

Your Baby is the size of a

Lettuce

The third and final trimester is here! Right now, your baby is beginning its work to be in the right position for birth. While they’re getting everything ready on their end, why not prepare yourself at the same time? If you’re planning on using a birth plan, start putting this together ahead of time so you’re all ready for the big day. It’s quite common for your nasal passage to become a little swollen at this time, so you might be told off by your partner for snoring!

At this point in your pregnancy, your baby is beginning its work to be in the proper position for birth. This will mean very soon that their head will be facing downwards, ready to enter the world. Now weighing in at over 1 kilo (around 1.1kg) and measuring about 38cm in length, your baby is just less than half the weight they will be at birth. The average baby in the UK weighs between 3.2kg and 3.4kg at birth and measures 51cm head to toe. Check with your midwife to see what your baby’s projected birth weight will be - you could be in for a big one!

Throughout your pregnancy, your baby will have been learning a variety of things from the real-world skills book and the latest thing on their list, is blinking. Some of the skills they will have already been working on also include breathing, coughing, and sucking. All of which will be key when they enter the world - another great sign that they are nearly ready!

At 28-weeks, you should have a midwife appointment to check how things are progressing. Your midwife will want to take a blood test to check that your iron levels are as they should be. As you are probably aware, women do lose blood during labour and birth. Should your iron levels come back as 'low', you will be prescribed iron tablets - your midwife will let you know if you need them. Being low in iron can also make you feel extra tired and quite breathless, so if you do find you are suffering with these symptoms, let your midwife or your GP know.

Another common occurrence as your nasal passages and mucous membranes in the nose become a little swollen thanks to something called 'pregnancy rhinitis', which is extremely common. All will be resolved once the baby arrives though - then they really won't get any sleep!

You may begin to experience sciatica towards the latter stages of the pregnancy, which in simpler terms is shooting pains that start around your buttocks and then down the back of one or both legs. This can also occur through a feeling of numbness or tingling instead of shooting pains.         

By week 28, most of your symptoms are directly related to the amount of space your little one now occupies inside of you. Here are some things you may experience this week.

Larger feet: As your body retains more fluid during pregnancy, it's not uncommon for your feet to swell and increase in size. This is typically temporary, so don’t feel like you need to run out and buy a whole wardrobe of new shoes!

Innie becoming an outie: Around this time, many expectant mums notice their belly button protruding outward as the uterus expands and pushes against the abdomen. This change is entirely normal and usually temporary.

Tingling, numbness, or pain in your hands and wrists: Carpal tunnel syndrome, characterised by tingling, numbness, or pain in the hands and wrists, is common during this stage of pregnancy due to fluid retention and swelling. Wearing a wrist splint and practicing gentle exercises may provide relief.

Stretch marks: As you enter the third trimester, you may notice stretch marks forming on your abdomen, breasts, and thighs. While they are a common part of pregnancy, keeping your skin moisturised can help minimise their appearance.

Swelling in your feet: It's common to experience swelling, known as edema, particularly in your ankles and feet during. This occurs due to increased fluid retention and pressure on blood vessels as your body adjusts to the demands of pregnancy. Elevating your legs and staying hydrated can help alleviate discomfort. Here’s how to reduce ankle swelling.

Crazy dreams: Hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy can result in vivid and sometimes unusual dreams. This is a common phenomenon and is usually harmless. Here’s a guide to pregnancy dreams.

Sweating: Hormonal fluctuations can lead to increased sweating during pregnancy, especially in the second trimester. This is the body's way of regulating its temperature. Wearing breathable clothing and staying hydrated before bed can help manage sweating. Here’s how to keep cool during pregnancy.

Remember, every pregnancy is different, and not everyone will experience the same symptoms. If you have any concerns about your symptoms, don't hesitate to reach out to your midwife or GP.

If you plan on using a birth plan, no matter what you're planning, you should write it out. A written birth plan, or a written statement of your and your partner's preferences for labour and delivery, may be a good idea. And bringing a copy of this plan to the hospital with you is an even better idea. It's a simple way to inform anyone you may come in to contact with of your preferences for this birth. 

There is no one way, or more correct way, to compose a birth plan. One may be several pages, typed, addressing every aspect of her birth requests; and one may simply be a short, written paragraph, detailing her wishes.

Questions Your Birth Plan Might Address

  • Do you want to listen to music? Did you bring any music?
  • Do you want access to a bath tub or shower?
  • Do you want pain medications? Do you have a preference?
  • Do you want an episiotomy?
  • Is there a position in which you would prefer to give birth?

Those who choose to write a birth plan may feel an enormous release of stress and anxiety surrounding the big day. So, set aside some time to discuss your personal labour and delivery wishes with your partner and to go over the many options available together.

Take a side profile pregnancy picture and write in your pregnancy journal this week.

Baby Wearing

Have you taken a good look at the various slings and baby carriers available? Baby-wearing is a practice that has been common throughout history and provides many benefits for babies and parents. The closeness and gentle motion often replicate the closeness of the womb - a familiar, warm, and safe association.

Baby-wearing also grants you the use your arms, so you're still able to complete those standards household tasks if your little one needs to be held at the same time. Wearing your baby is also a wonderful way to keep your baby close and protected from germs when you are out in public. 

Baby-wearing can stimulate bonding, promote nursing, and relieve tired arms. So, if you are interested in baby-wearing, you have boundless options. There are many types of carriers, and many ways to hold and use each. Head here for our top picks of the best baby carriers.

At a Glance

  • On the move: Baby is starting to position itself for birth, with the head facing downwards.
  • New skills: They’re busy mastering skills like blinking, breathing, coughing, and sucking in preparation for birth!
  • Snoring away: Increased snoring due to swollen nasal passages (pregnancy rhinitis) is common in the third trimester.
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Louise Broadbridge

Expert Midwife

Hi, my name is Louise, I am a registered senior midwife, founder of Let's Talk Birth and Baby antenatal classes and the face behind instagram's The Honest Midwife. I have taught over 100,000 expectant parents since starting my antenatal classes which have 5* reviews.

Why not try for yourself - FREE Natural Labour & Birth Class with me?

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The information on the Your Baby Club website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always discuss any health concerns with a qualified healthcare provider and carefully review all guidance that comes with any medications or supplements before taking.