Your Baby is the size of a

Cabbage

Your baby’s brain is rapidly developing! Their brain is quickly changing from smooth to the distinctive wavy texture we recognise. They’re also losing the lanugo hair layer they developed in the first trimester, as they begin to regulate their own temperature- they grow up so fast! You may be experiencing some forgetfulness, which is totally normal for the third trimester. Maybe keep a notepad around to jot down your to-dos and things to remember!

Week 30

Length : 39.8 cm

Weight : 1.31 kg

Week 30
Length : 39.8 cm
Weight : 1.31 kg

Your Baby is the size of a

Cabbage

Your baby’s brain is rapidly developing! Their brain is quickly changing from smooth to the distinctive wavy texture we recognise. They’re also losing the lanugo hair layer they developed in the first trimester, as they begin to regulate their own temperature- they grow up so fast! You may be experiencing some forgetfulness, which is totally normal for the third trimester. Maybe keep a notepad around to jot down your to-dos and things to remember!

The big bit of growth currently going on inside you, is to do with your baby's brain. It will no longer be smooth, instead it's beginning to take the more distinctive form with grooves and curves to allow for more brain tissue to form.

This lovely new brain your little one is forming will at this point, also be taking control of the temperature regulation they will be thankful for in the outside world. This means they will also be losing the hair which previously did this, known as 'lanugo'. You may find some remainders of this hair on your baby’s back and shoulders when they are born.

         

You're probably feeling a little sleep deprived and ready to lump anyone that recommends you "get some sleep now before the baby arrives". What can be just as frustrating, are the vivid dreams that may have made an unwelcome return. Don’t worry, dreaming you give birth to a rabbit in the middle of the supermarket is not a prediction of future events!

You may start to notice that you are itching quite a bit, especially on your tummy. This is due to the skin stretching as your baby grows. Keep it moisturised and stay hydrated to prevent stretch marks. Itching can also be a sign of something more serious - obstetric cholestasis, so if you find that the itching is unbearable, especially on your hands and feet at night, you must let your midwife know.

Around this stage of the pregnancy, you may also notice some of the less appreciated early symptoms of pregnancy re-emerging, with one of the most notable culprits being heartburn. Be sure to keep some pregnancy-safe heartburn remedies handy in case the day comes where this returns for you. When it does, find ways of cutting down on foods that are likely to cause it, for example fried or fatty foods, as well as fizzy drinks. If it gets bad, it's time to pay your GP a visit.         

Below is a list of pregnancy symptoms commonly experienced during week 30.

Swelling in your feet: It's common to experience swelling, known as edema, particularly in your ankles and feet during. This occurs due to increased fluid retention and pressure on blood vessels as your body adjusts to the demands of pregnancy. Elevating your legs and staying hydrated can help alleviate discomfort. Here’s how to reduce ankle swelling.

Tingling, numbness, or pain in your hands and wrists: Carpal tunnel syndrome, characterised by tingling, numbness, or pain in the hands and wrists, is common during this stage of pregnancy due to fluid retention and swelling. Wearing a wrist splint and practicing gentle exercises may provide relief.

Crazy dreams: Hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy can result in vivid and sometimes unusual dreams. This is a common phenomenon and is usually harmless. Here’s a guide to pregnancy dreams.

Braxton Hicks: This week, you might be experiencing Braxton Hicks contractions, also known as "practice contractions." These irregular and painless contractions are your body's way of preparing for labour. They may feel like a tightening sensation in your abdomen and typically occur infrequently. If they become frequent or painful, contact your healthcare provider. Here’s more on what to expect from contractions.

Foetal activity: By Week 30, your baby is more active than ever, and you may feel a variety of movements, from kicks and punches to squirms and rolls. Head here for more on when you’ll feel your baby kicking.

Sweating: Hormonal fluctuations can lead to increased sweating during pregnancy, especially in the second trimester. This is the body's way of regulating its temperature. Wearing breathable clothing and staying hydrated before bed can help manage sweating. Here’s how to keep cool during pregnancy.

Backaches and/or leg cramps: The additional weight and shift in your centre of gravity during pregnancy can strain your back muscles, leading to backaches. Gentle stretching and prenatal yoga can provide relief. Here’s how to ease pregnancy aches and pains.

Remember, every pregnancy is different, and not everyone will experience the same symptoms. If you have any concerns about your symptoms, don't hesitate to reach out to your midwife or GP.

Forgetful is, as forgetful does. Mind fog is normal during pregnancy, especially so in the third trimester, no matter how organised you once were. This mental nonsense will improve after the birth of your baby. And in the meantime, try to find the humour in your forgetfulness. You should also consider keeping a notepad on-hand or adopt the use of a note-taking app on your cellphone. For the most important of your to-dos, set an alarm on your cellphone.

Also, it's time to come to terms regarding if you'll use pain medication during labour and delivery. Many mums opt for a natural childbirth - natural meaning without the use of any pain medication - and many mums opt for an epidural at the hospital.

If you are interested in learning more about the various methods moms use to deliver naturally, research waterbirths and hypnobirthing. If you are leaning towards hospital medications, such as a local anaesthesia or another common medication used to reduce anxiety and ease or lessen the pain of contractions, you should include this in your birth plan.

Finding a Car Seat

Have you selected a car seat for your little one? Car seats are often sold as part of a traveling system, with a matching pram or pushchair. They are widely available and can range in price quite a lot. Head here for our guide to buying a pushchair.

Alternatively, you can opt for a convertible car seat. These operate in rear-facing mode until the baby passes its height and weight limits, and then converts to a forward-facing seat. Using a convertible seat from the beginning means only purchasing one car seat, but it also means sacrificing the convenience of being able to move a sleeping baby from car, to pushchair, to house, without disturbing your little one's slumber. You also may face difficulties with a convertible seat if you have a preemie, or low-birth weight baby.

Regardless, all car seats are required to meet minimum safety standards; so, no matter which type of seat you choose, it is a great idea to get your car seat and its installation checked by a certified car seat safety tech. Head here for our guide to car seat safety.

Have you packed your hospital bag? Download our hospital bag checklist here!

And don't forget to write in your pregnancy journal!

At a Glance

  • Baby's brain development: Your baby's brain is growing rapidly, developing grooves and curves to accommodate more brain tissue!
  • Temperature regulation: Your baby's brain is also taking control of temperature regulation, leading to the shedding of lanugo.
  • Returning heartburn: Heartburn may make a comeback around this stage of pregnancy. Keep pregnancy-safe remedies on hand!
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Louise Broadbridge

Expert Midwife

Hi, my name is Louise, I am a registered senior midwife, founder of Let's Talk Birth and Baby antenatal classes and the face behind instagram's The Honest Midwife. I have taught over 100,000 expectant parents since starting my antenatal classes which have 5* reviews.

Why not try for yourself - FREE Natural Labour & Birth Class with me?

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The information on the Your Baby Club website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always discuss any health concerns with a qualified healthcare provider and carefully review all guidance that comes with any medications or supplements before taking.