Your Baby is the size of a

Honeydew Melon

With only five weeks to go, your little one is now only a few centimetres off of their final birth length. They’ll definitely be getting nice and snug in there now, and won’t have much room left to kick, just wriggle around! Your body is busy getting ready, and you might be having deja vu from the first semester of the need to GO. While it might feel the same, this time is a bit different - you haven’t got hormones to blame, but instead your baby’s head pushing right on your bladder!

Week 35

Length : 44.2 cm

Weight : 2.4 kg

Week 35
Length : 44.2 cm
Weight : 2.4 kg

Your Baby is the size of a

Honeydew Melon

With only five weeks to go, your little one is now only a few centimetres off of their final birth length. They’ll definitely be getting nice and snug in there now, and won’t have much room left to kick, just wriggle around! Your body is busy getting ready, and you might be having deja vu from the first semester of the need to GO. While it might feel the same, this time is a bit different - you haven’t got hormones to blame, but instead your baby’s head pushing right on your bladder!

Space really is at a premium - your baby continues to pack on just over 200g per week and is just a couple of centimetres off its final birth length. That said, it is a myth that babies don't move as much because of the lack of space.

You may notice a change in the sensation of the movement, however, as the baby isn't able to practise those roundhouse kicks anymore. But you should still feel the baby wriggling around in there. If you are ever worried about baby's movements, get checked out.

Baby is growing even more brain cells this week and is settling further into their new head down position in your pelvis.

         

Despite coming towards the end of your pregnancy - hopefully just 5 weeks left - you are likely to find yourself once again needing to dash to the loo every 5 minutes. This time however, unlike in the first trimester where it was pregnancy hormones causing this unfortunate side effect, since your baby is in head down position it is pressing on your bladder, as well as giving you an increased likelihood of peeing after sneezing, coughing, or even laughing... Sorry!

One thing to ensure is that despite this, you do not cut down on fluids. Instead, always try and empty your bladder completely. One way which can help to do this, is to lean forward while peeing and also try some kegel exercises as a way of reducing potential incontinence.

         

Pregnancy is exhausting, but when you hold that little baby, you'll realise it was all entirely worth it! Here is a list of symptoms you may experience during week 35.

Stretch Marks: By week 35, your abdomen has likely expanded significantly to accommodate your growing baby, resulting in stretch marks. These pink, red, or purple streaks on the skin occur due to the stretching of the underlying tissues. They’re completely normal, but keeping up with moisturising or using stretch mark cream can help reduce the appearance.

Heartburn: As your baby grows, the uterus puts pressure on your stomach, leading to heartburn. This uncomfortable burning sensation in the chest occurs when stomach acid flows back into the oesophagus. Here’s more on heartburn during pregnancy.

Braxton Hicks: You may experience more frequent Braxton Hicks contractions in week 35, or experience them for the first time. These practice contractions help prepare your uterus for labour by toning the muscles, but they are typically irregular and less intense than real contractions. Here’s more on what to expect from contractions.

Constipation and/or Haemorrhoids: In week 35, constipation might be getting worse again due to the pressure of the growing uterus on the intestines. This can lead to haemorrhoids, which are swollen blood vessels in the rectal area, causing discomfort and sometimes bleeding during bowel movements. Make sure you’re staying hydrated and try to get some more fibre into your diet if you’re suffering from this. Head here for more on constipation during pregnancy.

Increased Vaginal Discharge: As your body prepares for labour, you may notice an increase in vaginal discharge. This discharge, called leukorrhea, is usually thin and milky and helps to protect the birth canal from infection. Here’s everything to know about vaginal discharge.

Nesting: As your due date approaches, you may experience bursts of energy and an overwhelming urge to prepare for your baby's arrival. This nesting instinct can involve organising the nursery, washing baby clothes, and tidying up the home in week 35. Don’t attempt anything too energy-intensive!

Sweating: Hormonal changes and increased blood flow can lead to excess sweating, particularly at night. This is your body's way of regulating its temperature during pregnancy. Consider having a cool flannel to hand by the side of the bed if you’re suffering from this. Here’s how to keep cool during pregnancy.

Interrupted Sleep: Discomfort from heartburn, backaches, and frequent bathroom trips, can disrupt your sleep patterns in week 35, leaving you feeling fatigued during the day. Try to limit your water intake before bed if bathroom trips are keeping you up.

Swelling or Bloating: Swelling, especially in the feet and ankles, is common in the third trimester due to increased fluid retention. Bloating may also persist as the uterus continues to expand, putting pressure on the digestive organs. Be easy on yourself, and try elevating your feet in the evenings to ease the swelling.

Crazy Dreams: Hormonal changes and subconscious anxieties about labour and motherhood may contribute to vivid and sometimes bizarre dreams during pregnancy, especially during these weeks. Here’s a guide to pregnancy dreams.


Remember, every pregnancy is different, and not everyone will experience the same symptoms. If you have any concerns about your symptoms, don't hesitate to reach out to your midwife or GP.

The phrase "slept like a baby" tends to make most of us conjure an image of this peaceful baby sleeping for hours, undisturbed by anything. Those first days after birth, or even weeks after birth, you may discover your little one snoozes most of the day away, totally oblivious to camera flashes and onlookers. As you spend too many hours just holding, cuddling, and gazing adoringly at your the sleeping angel, you may finally realise what "sleeping like a baby" means. It means passing gas, funny faces, little grunts, and a few grins.

Do your best to "sleep like a baby" as often as possible during the next few weeks. Not only is childbirth exhausting, but you will soon experience moments when your newborn is overly tired, turning into restless, cranky, demanding little creature who wakes up at all hours of the night with certain, demanding cries. Many new parents think that they are doing something wrong. Perhaps their first week home went wonderfully, and you had a newborn who sleep five hours straight at night. Maybe your little one peacefully snoozed from one feeding to another, giving you plenty of time to rest as well. And then the tides turn, and your little monster is depriving you of much needed sleep.

Sleep Issues

This happens, so don't worry if it happens to you. If it doesn't happen to you, count yourself insanely lucky and try to avoid gloating or bragging about it to the rest of us, please. You are more well-rested than the rest of us and we can't be held entirely accountable for how we'll respond to your chipper attitude.

You may not be able to avoid all sleep issues, but you can be prepared for them. Research the sleep advice of experts and learn about the various methods of getting babies to sleep through the night. There are plenty to choose from. You're sure to find one that fits your style and vision of parenting. Just keep in mind that your baby's temperament will play a large part in the success of any method. There are believers in co-sleeping and believers in keeping your little one in their own cot. Some who suggest closing the nursery door and not looking back until morning and others who suggest waiting through five minutes of crying before intervening. What works for some won't work for all, so take it all with a grain of salt and ask around. Talk with friends and family members who have seemingly well-rested children and find out what worked for them.

There is a reason why everyone is telling you to enjoy your sleep right now, while you can. Because a good night's sleep is super easy when you're 35 weeks pregnant... right?

Don't forget to write in your pregnancy journal; and take a side profile pregnancy body picture, too!

At a Glance

  • Final push: Expect your baby to pack on over 200g per week and grow a couple of centimetres closer to their final birth length.
  • Baby Einstein: Baby is growing more brain cells everyday to be ready to take on the outside world.
  • Increased bathroom trips: Due to the baby's head-down position, you may need to dash to the bathroom even more frequently as pressure on your bladder increases.
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Louise Broadbridge

Expert Midwife

Hi, my name is Louise, I am a registered senior midwife, founder of Let's Talk Birth and Baby antenatal classes and the face behind instagram's The Honest Midwife. I have taught over 100,000 expectant parents since starting my antenatal classes which have 5* reviews.

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The information on the Your Baby Club website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always discuss any health concerns with a qualified healthcare provider and carefully review all guidance that comes with any medications or supplements before taking.