Your Baby is the size of a

Romaine Lettuce

Feel like you can finally breathe properly again? You should be able to take bigger, deeper breaths now, as your little one moves away from your diaphragm. You should also have an antenatal appointment at some point this week to check on your blood pressure, urine, and the size of your bump. You might not feel like getting up and out of the house, but this will be one of the last appointments you have before the big day!

Week 36

Length : 47.4 cm

Weight : 2.6 kg

Week 36
Length : 47.4 cm
Weight : 2.6 kg

Your Baby is the size of a

Romaine Lettuce

Feel like you can finally breathe properly again? You should be able to take bigger, deeper breaths now, as your little one moves away from your diaphragm. You should also have an antenatal appointment at some point this week to check on your blood pressure, urine, and the size of your bump. You might not feel like getting up and out of the house, but this will be one of the last appointments you have before the big day!

Your baby will now be weighing around 2.7kg and its digestive system is ready to take in their first milk, marking the start of their continued growth in the outside world.

One benefit of this stage of the pregnancy is that since your baby is dropping slowly into your pelvic cavity, the pressure being put onto your diaphragm is relieved. This means you can take bigger, deeper breaths than you would have been able to throughout recent weeks.

Remember, during the later stages of the pregnancy, make sure you are continuing to note any changes surrounding the movement of your baby. If you are worried, do not hesitate to contact your midwife if there is an irregular change in movement frequency or an unusual change in the patterns of your baby's movements.

You are likely to have a midwife appointment this week. Your appointments should become more frequent now as it is important that your blood pressure and urine are checked on a regular basis to ensure you are not developing pre-eclampsia.

You may be asked if you have started to consider your birth plan. This is an opportunity to write down things that are important to you during labour such as your preferred pain relief options and your plans for how you are going to feed your baby.

Assuming everything is fine at this appointment, you are likely to be given another date to see the midwife again in a couple of weeks' time. You are so nearly there!

One thing you may be experiencing at this point, is an increase in pelvic pain. To tackle this, try relaxing with your hips elevated, pelvic exercises, warm baths and prenatal massages can all help too.

         

Below is a list of pregnancy symptoms commonly experienced during week 36.

Stretch Marks: By week 36, your abdomen has likely expanded significantly to accommodate your growing baby, resulting in stretch marks. These pink, red, or purple streaks on the skin occur due to the stretching of the underlying tissues. They’re completely normal, but keeping up with moisturising or using stretch mark cream can help reduce the appearance.

Nesting: As your due date approaches, you may experience bursts of energy and an overwhelming urge to prepare for your baby's arrival. This nesting instinct can involve organising the nursery, washing baby clothes, and tidying up the home in week 36. Don’t attempt anything too energy-intensive!

Heartburn: As your baby grows, the uterus puts pressure on your stomach, leading to heartburn. This uncomfortable burning sensation in the chest occurs when stomach acid flows back into the oesophagus. Here’s more on heartburn during pregnancy.

Braxton Hicks: You may experience more frequent Braxton Hicks contractions in week 36, or experience them for the first time. These practice contractions help prepare your uterus for labour by toning the muscles, but they are typically irregular and less intense than real contractions. Here’s more on what to expect from contractions.

Constipation and/or Haemorrhoids: In week 36, constipation might be getting worse again due to the pressure of the growing uterus on the intestines. This can lead to haemorrhoids, which are swollen blood vessels in the rectal area, causing discomfort and sometimes bleeding during bowel movements. Make sure you’re staying hydrated and try to get some more fibre into your diet if you’re suffering from this. Head here for more on constipation during pregnancy.

Increased Vaginal Discharge: As your body prepares for labour, you may notice an increase in vaginal discharge. This discharge, called leukorrhea, is usually thin and milky and helps to protect the birth canal from infection. Here’s everything to know about vaginal discharge.

Swelling or Bloating: Swelling, especially in the feet and ankles, is common in the third trimester due to increased fluid retention. Bloating may also persist as the uterus continues to expand, putting pressure on the digestive organs. Be easy on yourself, and try elevating your feet in the evenings to ease the swelling.

Crazy Dreams: Hormonal changes and subconscious anxieties about labour and motherhood may contribute to vivid and sometimes bizarre dreams during pregnancy, especially during these weeks. Here’s a guide to pregnancy dreams.

Sweating: Hormonal changes and increased blood flow can lead to excess sweating, particularly at night. This is your body's way of regulating its temperature during pregnancy. Consider having a cool flannel to hand by the side of the bed if you’re suffering from this. Here’s how to keep cool during pregnancy.

Interrupted Sleep: Discomfort from heartburn, backaches, and frequent bathroom trips, can disrupt your sleep patterns in week 36, leaving you feeling fatigued during the day. Try to limit your water intake before bed if bathroom trips are keeping you up.


Remember, every pregnancy is different, and not everyone will experience the same symptoms. If you have any concerns about your symptoms, don't hesitate to reach out to your midwife or GP.

Have you thought about where your little one will sleep when they’re here? It’s good to read up on safe sleep and have an idea of best practices before taking your little one home.

Establishing a Safe Sleep Routine

As a new parent, you want to do everything in your power to ensure your baby is healthy and happy, including creating a safe sleep environment for your little one. 

A safe sleep routine is essential to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related hazards, such as cot death. In this article, we'll guide you through the steps to establish a safe sleep routine for your baby, with tips recommended by the NHS and the Lullaby Trust:

1. Follow the “Back to Sleep” Advice

This means putting your baby on their back to sleep, not on their front or side, as this reduces the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

2. Use a Firm, Flat Sleep Surface

When choosing the safest sleep environment for your baby, there are a few things to consider. The safest place for a baby to sleep is in their own cot or Moses basket, which meets current safety standards.

3. Keep the Sleeping Area Cool and Free From Hazards

Babies sleep best in a cool, well-ventilated room. The ideal temperature for a baby’s room is between 16-20°C, and it helps to keep a thermometer nearby to ensure the room isn’t too hot or cold. 

4. Follow a Consistent Bedtime Routine

This might include a bath, a bedtime story, or a lullaby. Keep the routine simple and consistent, and try to start it at the same time each night.

5. Watch for Signs of Tiredness

Watch for signs of tiredness, such as yawning, rubbing their eyes, or becoming fussy and irritable.

6. Allow Your Baby to Self-Soothe

While it can be tempting to rock or cuddle your baby to sleep, allowing them to learn to self-soothe is important.

7. Be Patient and Flexible

Newborns have unpredictable sleep patterns, and it can take time to establish a consistent sleep routine. Be patient and flexible, and don’t be afraid to adjust your routine as needed.

By following safe sleep tips recommended by the NHS and the Lullaby Trust, such as placing your baby on their back to sleep and using a firm and flat sleep surface, you can help your baby to develop healthy sleep habits. Remember to be patient and flexible, and don’t hesitate to seek support if you’re struggling with your baby’s sleep.

At a Glance

  • Breathing easier: As your baby drops into your pelvic cavity, pressure on your diaphragm eases, hopefully allowing for bigger, deeper breaths.
  • Raring to go: Baby’s digestive system is now ready to take in their first milk!
  • Antenatal appointment: This will include a check on your blood pressure, urine, and the size of your bump.
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Louise Broadbridge

Expert Midwife

Hi, my name is Louise, I am a registered senior midwife, founder of Let's Talk Birth and Baby antenatal classes and the face behind instagram's The Honest Midwife. I have taught over 100,000 expectant parents since starting my antenatal classes which have 5* reviews.

Why not try for yourself - FREE Natural Labour & Birth Class with me?

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The information on the Your Baby Club website is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always discuss any health concerns with a qualified healthcare provider and carefully review all guidance that comes with any medications or supplements before taking.